Fido’s Begging Habit

Does your canine buddy basically teleport himself to your feet whenever you sit down with a plate of food? This is one of Fido’s cutest habits. However, begging is actually bad petiquette! A McHenry, IL vet discusses begging in this article.

History Of Begging

Did you know that dogs may have been domesticated as far back as 32,000 years ago? That probably means they have been begging for roughly 31,00 years, 11 months, and 29 days. Man’s Best Friend has a really long time to really work on his acting skills. He has definitely perfected that sad stare that is so effective at melting our hearts!

Dangers

Begging is cute, but there are some downsides to it. For one thing, somebody could give Fido something that isn’t safe for him. Dogs also sometimes have a way of getting more and more brazen when it comes to begging. This can eventually lead to unruliness, which can make guests very uncomfortable. Last but not least, it’s probably safe to say that begging has something to do with the ever-growing numbers of obese dogs.

Breaking The Habit

The best way to stop your furry pal from begging? Don’t reward him for it! If you give in, you’re actually encouraging this behavior. It’s also not a bad idea to tell Fido to stop. Be firm and consistent, and use the same phrasing every time. If he still persists, put him in his crate or another room while you are eating.

Bait And Switch

What if you can’t resist that adorable sad-puppy expression? If you are going to give in, offer Fido something healthy, like a carrot stick, instead of that meatball or cheeseburger he’s hoping for.

Treats

There’s nothing wrong with giving Fido treats. However, it’s best to do this as a reward for something, or at a specific time, as part of his daily doggy routine. Stick to safe, healthy options, and don’t go overboard. (Tip: treats should only make up about 5 percent of your pet’s daily caloric intake.)

Dangerous Foods

Never give Fido garlic, onions, scallions, or chives; grapes, currants, or raisins; alcohol; avocado; pitted fruits; chocolate; caffeine; dairy; meat on the bone; nuts; mushrooms; raw dough; or anything containing xylitol. Ask your vet for more information.

Please contact us, your local McHenry, IL vet clinic, for all of your dog’s veterinary care needs. We’re here to help!

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